Brenton

Brenton on Sea is a suburb about 15km’s from Knysna; travel along the N2 towards George and take a right after the White Bridge. The settlement cascades down sloping hills which eventually ends in a “far as the eye can see” white sanded beach. The settlement was named after Sir Jahleel Brenton, who declared Knysna a harbour in 1818. If you are lucky enough you may even be able to spot the endangered Brenton Blue Butterfly. With street names such as Agapanthus, Watsonia, Protea and Stinkhout the whole suburb is a testimony to the variety of both fauna and flora.

Adventure activities are countless at Brenton on Sea. Paraglide in safely off the top of a high hill (reachable only on foot) over the Indian Ocean or climb rocks that juts off the shore to fish for White Mussel Cracker, Garrick (Leerie), Kob and Grunter.

Brenton’s beach is not an ideal one for swimming and surfing because of the strong rip tides and rocks close to shore, but it is perfect for lazing on the beach or having a picnic. The kids will love looking for shells and might even catch a glimpse of jellyfish or blue bottles that have been washed up to shore.

If you’re feeling peckish after a fun-filled day, head up to Brenton’s choice of restaurants for a sundowner and snacks or a delicious pizza for something more substantial.

Are you travelling alone? Pack a picnic basket with cheese, biscuits and wine and sit on a wooden bench over-looking the Indian Ocean from one of the many spectacular viewpoints.

Save our water

The Knysna/Plett Harold published an article early this morning that climate change is taking its toll in the Western Cape.

It is believed that more municipalities will expect to request emergency water assistance due to high water consumption because of the recent fires.

The Agricultural Economist, Wandile Sihlobo, said changing weather patterns, including shifting rain periods, were putting pressure on the grain-producing areas of the western parts of the country.

“We have seen in South Africa of late a rapid pace of El Nino conditions. Whereas before we would have droughts spaced out between four or five years, we are now seeing these occurrences almost every two years.

“In 2016, we had a drought and 2017/18 there was a break, but we saw dry conditions returning towards the end of 2018, and now in 2019 in parts of the Western Cape and the Northern Cape.”

Sihlobo suggested farmers should consider irrigation and look at shifting planting seasons, as later than expected rainfall could become par for the course in years to come.

Former Cape Town mayor Patricia de Lille said policy-makers needed to lead a shift in the way water is distributed, stored and governed now that the Western Cape is becoming increasingly arid.

“Many of the water challenges and shortages at municipalities and also in the agricultural sector can be attributed to climate change. Rainfall patterns have changed and the new normal in the Western Cape is that it’s a drought-stricken area.

“So the challenge for the future is that we all have to change our relationship with water and not rest on our laurels when water is plentiful.”

Meanwhile, firefighting continues as wildfires break out due to extreme weather conditions.

Only here for the Beer

Beer would not be beer were it not for the hop plant. While you can make a beer without hops (the word ‘ale’ is thought originally to have meant exactly that), it is the hops that give to beer the distinctive flavour that most drinkers would probably consider to be the essence of the brew. These are the soft green cones of the plant Humulus lupulus. Only the female plant produces cones, and the magic ingredients that the brewer seeks are found only in tiny glands at the base of each leaf-like bract within the cone.

The hops contribute to the making of beer in several ways, notably the addition of taste and smell. Bittering hops give the brew its characteristic bitter taste, while aroma hops give it its beery scent. Hops also act as a natural preservative, help to clarify the beer and to form and fix the frothy head.

Until the early decades of this century all the hops used in South Africa’s brewing industry had to be imported, but in the 1920s the brewers began to wonder if it would not be possible to grow their hops at home. The conditions for the plant’s growth, however, were stringent: a minimum number of daylight hours in summer, a six- to eight-week dormant period in winter when it needs to be chilled, and a plentiful water supply throughout the growing season. Only one small part of the country met these conditions: the rich farmlands around George, and one or two well-watered valleys in the Outeniqua Mountains. Today 480 ha are cultivated, enough for half of South Africa’s needs. A visitor cannot miss the hop fields in summer. The plant is a fast-growing climber that shoots up in spring, the specially erected trellises towering as much as 4 meters above the ground so that the fields look like giant vineyards. The rate of growth is so remarkable – up to 20 centimetres a day – that some farmers (the older ones, who have had time to sit down and study such things) insist that the patient visitor will actually see a plant growing taller before his eyes.

Jaguar Simola Hillclimb wins the Environmental award

The Jaguar Simola Hillclimb continues to be known as one of the top sports events in the country having been awarded MSA’s Environmental Award at the annual MSA Gala Awards Evening. 

MSA seeks to recognise and show its gratitude to the circuit, organiser, club or individual, who is assessed to have made a significant contribution towards or have done something important to enhance environmental awareness and protection in the field of motorsport during the calendar year.

The Eden Regeneration Festival initiative supported by the Jaguar Simola Hillclimb, namely the Festival of Action, focused its efforts on multi-stakeholder engagement including local communities, local government, NGOs and academia to support and collaborate on existing initiatives by bringing their time, logistics and human resources.

Read the full story…

474 Freesia Place

R 3 400 000
4 Beds 3 Baths 1 Garages

Floor Area: 280 m²
Land Area: 630 m²
Rates: R 1400 p.m.

Yes, you can have everything ! Come on in and experience the perfect blend of modern architecture and upmarket design in a Cul de Sac location.

Sip cocktails watching the sun set in this magnificent home, features four spacious bedrooms, all neatly tiled and built-in cupboards, as well as three modern bathrooms, with one being the master en-suite. This home offers a comfortable, small chef’s kitchen with granite counter tops and ample kitchen cupboards … the place where delectable meals are created.

The kitchen, lounge, dining room and master en-suite are on the top level and the rest of the bathrooms, bedrooms and 2nd lounge / entrance hall on the lower level. Large entertainment decks, loads of natural light and a beach theme interior throughout the house complete the picture. (Available at an additional 200K).

Brenton On Sea… your Holiday / Permanent Haven, only 15km from Knysna on the Garden Route in South Africa !

Key Property Features:

  • 4 Bedrooms
  • 3 Bathrooms
  • 1 Dining Areas
  • 1 En-suite
  • 1 Garages
  • 2 Lounges
  • 1 Storeys
  • Air Con
  • Alarm
  • Balcony
  • BIC
  • Deck
  • Entrance Hall
  • Family Tv Room
  • Garden
  • Guest Toilet
  • Kitchen
  • Laundry
  • Patio
  • Paving
  • Pet Friendly
  • Scenic View
  • Sea View
  • Storage
  • Slideshow: 474 Freesia Place (SP57)

    Voyage’s end at an ancient, evergreen land

    The Southern Coast, after several hundred kilometres of low-lying sandy shores, reaches Cape St Blaize and curls into a gentle blue bay. The golden sand continues around the bay, punctuated by sleepy river lagoons, but now a high range of mountains comes into view and the sands give way to a gigantic coastal shelf that juts out into the sea.

    The mountains are the Outeniquas, and they bring year-round rains to the land at their feet, keeping it constantly emerald green. Where the coastal shelf meets the sea, waves have ground it away into high cliffs of orange-red rock, and here and there have carved coves and inlets. Many a ship has come to grief on this violent shore, and legend has it that a chest of treasure lies caught here in the rocks amid the foaming surf.

    A mere 110 kilometres, or one and a half hours drive, from Knysna lies the booming town; Mossel Bay where giant waves relentlessly punish the awesome, towering cliffs that line the southern shore of Cape St Blaize, baring the rock strata and gouging out huge caverns. And yet, just 3 km along the coastline, tucked away around the corner of the cape, the water in the sheltered little cove known as Munro’s Bay is as calm and gentle as an inland lake… which is why this spot was the first landing place of Bartholomeu Dias and his men. Today the calmness of the water in the bay, one of the most sheltered stretches of open sea along the entire southern African coast, attracts thousands of holiday-makers and water sport enthusiasts.

    All along the Mossel Bay shore there are beaches sprinkled among the rocks. Even at the very point of Cape St Blaize there is a sandy channel set between two rocky ridges that have long been treated by locals as the town swimming pool – known to all as the ‘Poort’. Travelling around the great bay from here the first major inlet is the harbour, then comes Munro’s Bay, Santos Beach, a string of little beaches separated by rocky ridges and known collectively as Die Bakke, the Pansy Beach and the long golden stretch of Dias Beach, which in summer become the vibrant heart of the holiday town. The coast immediately behind the shore is kept tidy and attractive with green lawns and a succession of neat camping grounds, and caravan sites, interspersed with clusters of luxurious holiday chalets.

    Anyone tiring of the lovely beaches will find the town itself has much to offer. Its history is well presented in a new museum complex near the old Post Office Tree where Pedro d’Ataide posted South Africa’s first ‘letter’ in 1500. A section of the museum is devoted to maritime history, another to a shell collection with fine specimens gathered from various seashores all over the world.

    Also interesting is a drive or walk past the harbour to the Point at Cape St Blaize. You will pass a large number of sturdy stone houses: there are at least 200 of these, many of them built during the last century by immigrant Cornish stonemasons. The majority of the houses in the town are built in ranks that climb up the hillside, with the result that most residents wake in the morning and retire at night to magnificent views out over the little harbour and across the bay to the jagged blue-grey line of the Outeniqua Mountains in the distance. At the Point, directly above the sandy Poort, you will see a cave in the cliff face beneath the Cape St Blaize lighthouse; this was long the home of so-called Strandlopers. From the south side of the cave a narrow footpath zigzags up towards the base of the lighthouse then leads east for several kilometres along the clifftops, offering grand vistas down over the majestic cliffs.

    Mossel Bay offers a variety of holiday accommodation and recreational activities. Especially popular is the range of opportunities for the angler, produced by the varied character of the shoreline and the extreme differences in sea conditions; Mossel Bay is also one of South Africa’s leading centres for powerboat fishing.

    Recently the development of offshore oil wells in the region has begun to transform what was once a slightly sleepy coastal town into a bustling growth centre, but this is unlikely to mar the appeal of the place for holiday-makers. The town will remain blessed with an attractive blue-sky climate and there are so many beautiful beaches along the shore that they can absorb huge numbers of holiday-makers without being spoilt.

    Watsonia Avenue

    R 2 700 000
    Negotiable
    6 Beds 4 Baths

    Floor Area: 260 m²
    Land Area: 1396 m²
    Rates: R 1500

    Brenton On Sea. Time to escape the rat race and come home to an exclusive, secure, coastal village in a perfect location.

    This private iconic sanctuary enjoys a tranquil setting with captivating north facing views and only 15km situated from Knysna on the Garden Route in South Africa.

    The house offers ample accommodation possibilities and a stone throw away from easy access to the beach. Surrounded by prestigious houses.

    A Very Good Place To Start ! Contact me Now !!!

    Key Property Features:

    • 6 Bedrooms
    • 4 Bathrooms
    • 1 Dining Areas
    • 2 En-suite
    • 1 Lounges
    • 2 Storeys
    • Balcony
    • BIC
    • Entrance Hall
    • Garden
    • Garden Cottage
    • Kitchen
    • Pantry
    • Paving
    • Scenic View
    • Storage

    Slideshow: Watsonia Avenue (SP54)

    Blue Flag beaches

    The Wildlife & Environment Society of South Africa (WESSA) has announced that 66 Blue Flags will be flown at 46 beaches, eight marinas and by 12 sustainable tourism boats around South Africa over the forthcoming 2018/19 Blue Flag season.

    The Blue Flag program is focused on the conservation of marine and coastal habitats, and is designed to raise environmental education and awareness, and increase environmental practices.

    To achieve Blue Flag status, as many as 33 different criteria spanning four aspects of coastal management must be met and maintained:

    • water quality,
    • environmental education and information,
    • environmental management, and
    • safety and services.

    Each Blue Flag site is compelled to conduct several environmental education activities during the year, and practice effective and efficient conservation management.

    This year 24 beaches across three provinces have been awarded ‘pilot status’ and throughout the 2018/19 Blue Flag season WESSA said it will work with beach managers stewards from these pilot beaches towards the longer-term goal of achieving full Blue Flag status.

    You can find the full list of Blue Flag beaches below: